Google Pixel 2 for Business Use?

Source http://areebyasir.com/?p=218

I have to start off by saying I am surprised at the specs or lack of them right out of the box I wouldn’t buy because there is no value there and no compelling features over the average phone. The entry level 5″ model comes in at $899 and the XL 6″ at $1159 USD. What is especially disappointing is the lackluster 4GB of RAM in both models this is quite shocking for a flagship phone I would say it is a low-end phone in terms of RAM which is a big deal to me and I think most people. If you don’t have enough RAM your apps will slow down and start swapping. There is also nothing that I see is groundbreaking in this phone compared to the iPhone-X.

If this phone came in at a budget price I’d say it would be a good value but like many, I am comparing it against flagship Chinese phones such as my OnePlus 5 that I recently bought. In comparison my One Plus 5 came in at $540 USD has 8GB of RAM, 128GB of storage and dual-SIM slot (very hand when traveling abroad/on business).

I think Google is going to be creating more work for itself and it needs to decide if it’s competing against the OnePlus or Apple because both are very different types of market segments and this phone fits into the middle of the pack in terms of specs but at a premium price. It just doesn’t make sense because these phones don’t carry any prestige that say a Samsung or Apple would.

I’m sorry for not going into more depth but for the way I purchase I had to stop at the 4GB of RAM I cannot believe any 2017 flagship phone would have such little memory.
The Pixel 2 looks like a good phone but it is overpiced and underspec’d and usually I say specs are not an issue but at that price point it certainly is and I’d say the iPhone-X is the better value. Think of it this way though you could almost buy 2 OnePlus 5’s with 8GB of RAM for the price of one Pixel 2.

iPhone-X 10 Thoughts and Personal Business Review

I thought I’d put my thoughts down trying to keep up with all the new phones and technologies and put it in perspective and keep it relative for business/professional use, security, practicality and value first.

I will admit iPhone-X is exciting in terms of new features it is groundbreaking and what Apple needed at this point in time!

Apple iPhone-X’s key new features (to me)

AR (Augmented Reality)
Yes another “Reality” based feature, augmented reality has huge capabilities both practical and impractical. For example it is cool that you can literally use this phone as a ruler and drag it across the floor to do so. However would I do this if I owned one of these? No, how often would you use this feature and would you use a high-end phone in this manner? However, as some point out, it remains to be seen the adoption rate of this technology. For me it comes down to practical use and at this moment there is not a whole lot of it out there aside from gaming and social apps. If there are new groundbreaking apps that can be used practically everyday that don’t have any other efficient method then AR will take off, however if not, AR may just go the way of the old 3D Virtually Reality console by Nintendo. I personally think AR will take off but it simply depends on how long until practical apps come out. So far most of what I’m seeing is not a game changer in terms of “this AR app does something I could never possibly do without AR technology”.

Facial Recognition
Sorry but this doesn’t interest me and also scares me at the same time! Facial recognition technology is nothing new but rather new to the phone unlocking world. However is this a good idea? I don’t think so, under duress or even if you are injured or incapacitated someone can take your face and unlock your phone or use your finger for the fingerprint reader. Passwords in this aspect on their own may be safer if it is complex, secure and no one knows it.

Pros
iOS is the most efficient and fastest performing mobile OS in my opinion with the best user experience. It is a very slick interface that works extremely well. Without iOS the iPhone would not be what it is. It definitely has a wow and latest and great factor without a doubt.

Cons
iOS is closed-source and suffers from more malware and security issues than Android. It lacks the customization features that Android does.
The all glass phone sure sounds cool but the possibility of any part of the chassis breaking or cracking is a big issue, still, Apple has probably done their homework on it and made it extremely strong but the prospect of dropping a glass phone is not nice to think about!

Conclusion
This phone comes at a premium price but doesn’t disappoint with features or specs but this is fairly standard today, all new flagship phones are more than adequate for most users so I never worry about specs. The above is simply based on what makes the phone different to me. The iPhone 3G/3GS to me was the most groundbreaking phone in its time and I had a 3GS (and still have it today) but I do not feel the iPhone 10 is the same level of groundbreaking because there was simply nothing like it back then and today it’s not quite the case. I wouldn’t buy one for my needs in terms of business I have more concerns about security.

Apple CEO Tim Cook’s Business Decision to Fight the FBI/Court Order

Mr. Cook has clearly made a strategic decision to be one of the first and few tech companies to challenge a court order of this magnitude, and if anyone can do it, it would be Apple.

Now to be clear there is a very serious matter in this case, and it is a tricky rope for investigators and business to get it right.  A crime has been committed and the authorities have presumably presented credible evidence and there is a court order, however the order is essentially unlimited access to all Apple devices.  The business (Apple) has two choices, co-operate or deal with the consequences of not doing so, in Apple’s case there is little financial consequence to not co-operate.  The opposite case could be made that Apple recognizes that if the public finds out that they complied that their encryption is as good as useless, their analysts probably put a price tag on the customer backlash and likely predicted a huge drop in AAPL shares.  Aside from the business case, it looks like now that the issue of privacy has come knocking on his doorstep, he has no choice but to take a bold and very public stand.

This is not a typical court order but is in effect a blanket and mass surveillance project.  Apple is basically being asked to make an app and backdoor to bypass their encryption, or at least disable the 10-try mechanism so they can try traditional bruteforce password methods.  Tim Cook stated very clearly that the ramifications would go far beyond this one case and validated his concerns by mentioning there would be little control over oversight over such a mechanism if Apple complied, which could mean the backdoor could be abused without due cause, as has been the case in the past with other surveillance.

One wonders if Apple has pondered its next move because it is unlikely that Apple can indefinitely delay or win the fight in the end.  They are legally under US jurisdiction and must win their challenge or comply.  Failing that Apple’s only option would be to move overseas/off-shore and this would be a huge blow for the US economy, tech sector and other companies may follow suit, such as McAfee’s weighing in on the issue and offer to crack the iPhone.

My philosophy has always been the US is a great place to do business with huge potential, but I always advise people to understand that any traffic transiting the US and especially data stored there is subject to US laws and regulations.

It will be interesting to watch where this goes, I have a feeling that most are cheering for Apple and Tim Cook at the moment and it is really no wonder with what is at stake.